6 conditions that occur in caffeine withdrawal

If you have become physically dependent on caffeine, you may experience withdrawal symptoms such as headaches or fatigue if you decide to quit or cut back.

The severity of withdrawal symptoms often depends on how much caffeine you had before and how drastically you reduced your intake. Be careful and slow when quitting caffeine, as the brain can become addicted when used over time. So the brain can gradually re-adapt.

 

Headaches

Caffeine causes blood vessels in the brain to constrict, which slows blood flow. Reducing or stopping caffeine intake allows blood vessels to open and increases blood flow to the brain.

This sudden change in blood flow can cause headaches that can vary in length and severity as the brain adapts to the increase in blood flow. Headaches will decrease as the brain adapts to this increase in blood flow.

 

Nausea

Some people experience flu-like symptoms, such as nausea, with caffeine withdrawal. In some cases, this can also cause vomiting.

 

Fatigue

Many people consume caffeinated beverages first thing in the morning to help them wake up. Caffeine blocks the brain’s receptors for a neurotransmitter that makes you sleepy. Therefore, it is not surprising that you feel tired after you stop consuming it.

 

Difficulty concentrating

Caffeine has some cognitive benefits, as well as the ability to improve problem-solving abilities, memory, and reaction time. For this reason, you may find that you have trouble concentrating when you start taking less or not eating at all.

 

Irritability

Caffeine increases the number of receptors in the brain for dopamine, a feel-good chemical that triggers satisfaction and pleasure. Therefore, when you stop consuming caffeine or reduce your intake, you may feel less motivated overall.

 

Depressed mood

Caffeine has also been found to have mood-boosting effects after research. But this also suggests that your mood may start to drop once you stop consuming it. If you stop caffeine suddenly, depression is more likely to start or get worse.

References

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